Japanese team tries inkjet printing on perovskite as a way to lower production costs

Researchers from three Japanese universities, led by Japan’s Kanazawa University, have developed a process based on inkjet printing they say could reduce the cost of perovskite solar cell production. The group fabricated small cells with efficiencies as high as 13.19%, a figure they claim is promising enough to offer the possibility of scaling up to commercial production.

Japanese scientists trial printing on perovskite imageSchematic illustration of (a) the OEI setup used to pattern the TiO2 CL on FTO glass substrates and (b) the device structure of OEI-TiO2 CL-based PSCs.

The team has developed a process for depositing a titanium dioxide electron transport layer (ETL) onto a perovskite. The group claim the method could be scaled up to cut costs for manufacturers moving towards commercial perovskite cell manufacturing.

Empa and Solaronix design new manufacturing processes for commercialization of perovskite solar cells

An Empa team led by Frank Nüesch, Head of Empa's Functional Polymers Department, has been working in recent years on new manufacturing processes for perovskite solar cells in order to produce them not only faster but also cheaper. To this end, the researchers collaborated with Solaronix, a company based in western Switzerland, as part of a project of the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE). Together they produced a functional perovskite cell on a laboratory scale with a surface area of 10x10cm.

For the production of this novel perovskite cell, the so-called slot-die process is used. Here, the material layer is applied to a substrate of glass and then structured by removing excess material with a laser. "With the new coating process, we can not only coat faster, but also determine the thickness of the layers more flexibly," says Nüesch. In the future, the slot-die process will make it possible to coat meter-long webs relatively easily and quickly. The coating speed is then also the central element in a possible industrialization of perovskite cell production.

Japan’s NEDO and Panasonic achieve 16.09% efficiency for large-area perovskite solar cell module

Panasonic Corporation has achieved an energy conversion efficiency of 16.09% for a perovskite solar module (Aperture area 802 cm2: 30 cm long x 30 cm wide x 2 mm thick) by developing lightweight technology using a glass substrate and a large-area coating method based on inkjet printing.

Panasonic and NEDO achieve 16.09% efficiency PSC image

This was carried out as part of the project of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), which is working on the "Development of Technologies to Reduce Power Generation Costs for High-Performance and High-Reliability Photovoltaic Power Generation" to promote the widespread adoption of solar power generation.

New perovskite material may enable 38.7% efficient silicon\perovskite tandem cells

Scientists from Japan’s Gifu University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology have identified a chalcogenide perovskite material with light absorption attributes strong enough to offer the potential for a theoretical maximum conversion efficiency of 38.7% in a silicon perovskite tandem solar cell.

The material – BaZrTiS3 – has a light absorption coefficient exceeding 105cm-1, the highest of all solar cell materials including chalcogenide perovskites such as SrZrS3, BaHfS3 and SrHfS3, the scientists claim.

Berkeley team creates perovskite blue LED and illustrates both limitations and potential of perovskite semiconductors

University of California, Berkeley, scientists have created a blue light-emitting diode (LED) from halide perovskites, overcoming a major barrier to using these cheap, easy-to-make materials in electronic devices.

In the process, however, the researchers discovered a fundamental property of halide perovskites that may prove a barrier to their widespread use as solar cells and transistors. Alternatively, this unique property may open up a whole new world for perovskites far beyond that of today's standard semiconductors.