New approach to stabilize perovskite material may yield improved solar cells

An international research team, including scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has found a stable that efficiently creates electricity and could be extremely beneficial for perovskite solar cells.

The researchers show how the material CsPbI3, an inorganic perovskite, has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

Tokyo Tech team discovers a way to improve perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a new strategy to make efficient perovskite-based LEDs with improved brightness by leveraging the quantum confinement effect.

Photoluminescence and electroluminsecence in low-dimensional and 3D perovskite-based devices image(A) Photoluminescence and (B) electroluminsecence in low-dimensional and 3D perovskite-based devices

Devices that emit light when an electric current is applied, are referred to as electroluminescent devices, which have become orders of magnitude more efficient than the traditional incandescent light bulb. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) make for the most notable and prevalent category of these devices. Many additional types of LEDs also exist.

Perovskites may help improve detectors for nuclear security

Researchers from the University of Florida and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory set out to improve global nuclear security by enhancing radiation detectors, and discovered, after evaluating a diverse list of over 60 candidates for alternative semiconductor compounds, that a hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite has the highest potential to succeed.

Perovskite sensors can improve equipment used for detecting and identifying radioactive materials imageBetter sensors can improve equipment used for detecting and identifying radioactive materials. (Image credit: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

The scientists reported that the identification of better sensor materials and the development of smarter algorithms to process detector signals are essential to enhance radiation detectors. Paul Johns, Physicist, University of Florida, said: "The end users of radiation detectors don’t necessarily have a background in physics that allows them to make decisions based on the signals that come in. The algorithms used to energy-stabilize and identify radioactive isotopes from a gamma ray spectrum are therefore key to making detectors useful and reliable".

Kyushu researchers use perovskites to create micrometer-thick OLEDs

Scientists at Kyushu University in Japan have created micrometer-thick organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by integrating thick layers of hybrid perovskite with thin organic layers. Such devices have the potential to enhance the viewing angles and affordability of high-performance TVs and various other displays.

A test organic light-emitting diode (OLED) incorporating thick layers of hybrid perovskite emits green light imageA test organic light-emitting diode (OLED) incorporating thick layers of hybrid perovskite emits green light. (Image credit: William J. Potscavage Jr., Kyushu University)

OLEDs use layers of organic molecules to efficiently change electricity into light. While these molecules are excellent emitters, they are usually poor conductors of electricity. This is why researchers strive to use extremely thin layers (around 100 nm) to allow electricity to easily reach where emission takes place in the center of the devices.

Japanese team boosts the efficiency of perovskite LEDs

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and Nihon University in Japan have explored a new approach using an exciton confinement effect to optimize highly efficient perovskite LEDs.

Japanese team improves perovksite LEDs imageThe structure of a large perovskite LED, where a layer of zinc oxide was deposited on the a-zinc silicate electron transport layer, providing greater brightness with better power efficiency. Credit: Tokyo Institute of Technology

To achieve an efficient electroluminescent device, the team required a high photoluminescence quantum yield emission layer, efficient electron hole injection and transport layers, and high light out-coupling efficiency. With each new advance in emission layer materials, new functional materials are required to realize a more efficient LED. To accomplish this goal, the authors of the study explored the performance of an amorphous zinc-silica-oxide system layered with perovskite crystals to improve the diode performance.