Israeli-German researchers demonstrate continuous lasing action in devices made from perovskite materials

A collaborative study between Tel Aviv University (TAU) in Israel and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) in Germany demonstrates remarkable continuous lasing action in devices made from perovskites.

"In contrast to previous studies around the world, this is the first study to exhibit continuous lasing action, as opposed to pulsed operation," says Prof. Jacob Scheuer of TAU's Department of Physical Electronics, who led the TAU team of researchers. "This family of materials is considered the most promising candidate for a future laser-based industry, because their fabrication is simple, fast and inexpensive compared to current semiconductor materials being used for these purposes. In addition, these materials can support the realization of solid-state lasers emitting in green, necessary for future lighting, displays and projectors," Prof. Scheuer adds. "Current semiconductor lasers emit light only in red and blue."

An international research team develops method for printing nanolasers from perovskites

An international research team has developed a new method of synthesizing miniature light sources. The method is based on a unique laser which produces millions of nanolasers from a perovskite film in a few minutes. Such lasers look like small disks, work at room temperature and have a tunable emission wavelength from 550 to 800 nm. The high speed and good reproducibility of this method make it promising for the industrial production of single nanolasers as well as whole chains.

An international research team develops method for printing nanolasers from perovskitesA scheme of the synthesis and operation and an image of the final nanolasers

Such miniature light sources or nanolasers are required, for example, for producing optical chips that could process information in next-gen devices. However, making such light sources is generally not that easy due to unstable materials, as well as the complex and expensive fabrication methods, which are difficult to control and adjust for industrial production. The scientists from ITMO, the Far Eastern Federal University, Texas University at Dallas, and the Australian National University have found a new way to solve this problem. They have developed a method that may enable the creation of millions of nanolasers from an optically active halide perovskites in a few minutes.

Researchers demonstrate controlled epitaxial growth of all inorganic lead-free halide perovskites

A research team composed of scientists from Michigan State University and University of Michigan has deployed a new approach to growing all inorganic lead-free halide perovskites.

Perovskite quantum wells scheme image

"Epitaxial growth has long since revolutionized the study of many electronic materials including silicon, oxide perovskites, and III-V semiconductors," said Richard Lunt, an Associate Professor at Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University who has supervised the project. "There is very little known about the epitaxial growth of halide perovskites, but these exciting materials hold enormous potential. This has motivated us to explore this entirely new research area."

Perovskite-Info interviews Ossila's lead perovskite scientist

UK-based Ossila provides components, equipment and materials to enable faster and smarter organic electronics research and discovery. Ossila provides both materials and equipment for perovskite researchers, and the company's lead perovskite scientist, Dr. Jonathan Griffin, was kind enough to answer a few questions we had for him.

Perovskite crystals (Ossila)Thanks to improved knowledge about salt-solvent interactions, single crystals of perovskites can now be grown. Pictured above are several single-crystal MAPbBr perovskites, alongside the seed crystals used to grow these crystals

Dr. Griffin holds nearly a decade of experience working in organic photovoltaic research and over 5 years of working with perovskites. At Ossila, Jonathan works on technical support for several material ranges, including perovskites, organic photovoltaics, graphene and other 2-D materials. He is also involved in the development of new test equipment and product ranges. Prior to this, he worked in a postdoctoral research position at the University of Sheffield.

Q: Thank you for your time Dr. Griffin. Can you detail for us Ossila's perovskite product range in general?

Unique properties of perovskite materials may lead to better LEDs

Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Center for Computational Materials Science, working with an international team of physicists, have found that nanocrystals made of cesium lead halide perovskites (CsPbX3), is the first discovered material which the ground exciton state is "bright," making it an attractive candidate for more efficient solid-state lasers and light emitting diodes (LEDs).

The work focused on lead halide perovskites with three different compositions, including chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Nanocrystals made of these compounds and their alloys can be tuned to emit light at wavelengths that span the entire visible range, while retaining the fast light emission that gives them their superior performance.